MaxPreps: Connecticut ranked No. 13 nationally in football scoring

National football scoring averages, compiled by MaxPreps.com (Graphic by  Ryan Escobar, MaxPreps)

National football scoring averages, compiled by MaxPreps.com (Graphic by Ryan Escobar, MaxPreps)

New Canaan's Nick Casione looks for a receiver during last year's football season. The Rams were the third-highest scoring teams in the state in 2013 with 46.3 points per game.

New Canaan’s Nick Casione looks for a receiver during last year’s football season. The Rams were the fourth-highest scoring teams in the state in 2013 with 46.3 points per game.

MaxPreps published a look at state-by-state scoring averages across the country and, since we know you’re dying to know: Connecticut comes in at No. 13 on the list.

Texas (of course) topped the list at 55.48 points per game, followed by Arizona (53.93), Oregon (53.85), Nevada (53.74) and West Virginia (53.48). MaxPreps notes all are states “that feature progressive, innovative offenses at their respective in-state universities.”

From the article: 

Arkansas, where Gus Malzahn perfected his spread offense in the high school coaching ranks, is just outside the top 10 at 52.46 points per game.

Most states in Big 12 or Pac-12 territory, including Oklahoma (seventh at 52.46) and Kansas (21st at 51.21) finished in the top half of states, suggesting some correlation between the offensive approaches at the high school level and the college game.

That brings us back to Connecticut, which is described by writer Stephen Spiewak as an ‘outlier’ among lower-scoring Northeastern states. Vermont checks in at 51.36, but the rest of New England and the northeast (including New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania) check-in relatively far below Connecticut’s average.

First, a few caveats: The MaxPreps data is based on user input, from coaches, MaxPreps administrators and fans. All of Connecticut’s scores seem to be accounted for, but there’s no way to be really sure just how good all of the information is. Also, we’re not positive that Prep schools were accounted for or were counted at all (we’re checking on that). So think of this as a broad picture that may not be entirely accurate.

Anyway… At first thought, you’d think Connecticut’s scoring averages might be low, what with ‘score management’ the law of the land.

Then again, maybe ‘score management’ actually helps Connecticut’s scoring average as teams close to the barrier pull starters and resort to weird strategies (i.e. allowing kickoff return TDs or fumbling and what-not, to stay under the 51-point threshold.

Also, I think we can all agree that Connecticut is pretty progressive itself with offenses. Ansonia aside, a majority of the state’s programs have gone to some form of spread formation over the last 10-15 years. As a result, the state’s offense and scoring records have been obliterated over the last 10 years.

Plus, consider that Connecticut is one of the few states that regularly pits schools of all sizes against each other in the regular season, and you have a recipe for one of the nation’s highest-scoring states.

Overall, in Connecticut the four state champions ranked highest among scoring teams in 2013: Ansonia, was the highest with 51.3 points per game. They were followed by St. Joseph (49.9), Southington (43.8), New Canaan (43.6) and St. Paul (43.1).

The bottom 5 of the Top 10 were Barlow (42.0), Valley Regional/Old Lyme (41.4), Wolcott (41.0), West Haven (39.7) and Capital Prep/Classical (39.4).

Comments

  1. BW says

    “Then again, maybe ‘score management’ actually helps Connecticut’s scoring average as teams close to the barrier pull starters and resort to weird strategies (i.e. allowing kickoff return TDs or fumbling and what-not, to stay under the 51-point threshold.”

    Really? Your rationale is pretty weak. So for those 5 times in a season when some team winning by more than 50 points actually lets the weaker team scores. That somehow makes up for the 40 times in a season where a team calls the dogs off to avoid getting close or surpassing a 50 point lead. Think about it, for every time a team subs in, takes a knee, or manages the game score to keep <50 point spread, do you really think there is an equivalent number of times that a team makes a farce of a game by letting the other team score.

    There is no doubt that without the 50 point rule there would be more points scored in CT.

    • Sean Patrick BowleySean Patrick Bowley says

      Yes, I do. I think there are plenty of programs that would call the dogs off up 35 and 42 even without the 50 point cap.

      Again, nobody has hard numbers on it, so it’s difficult to tell for sure. It probably decreases scoring, but I don’t think by as much as we’d think.

  2. JB says

    Typically coaches like to put the game out of reach by half-time (up by Sean’s 35-42 pts is a good range) and then bring in the JV offense to start the 3rd quarter so they can get varsity experience. Most of the starting defense stays in the game during the 3rd quarter until the spread gets to about 50 pts. Then the JV defense is sprinkled in and the losing team scores 1 – 2 TDs in the fourth quarter.

    Most of the classy program coaches manage it like that and do not want to embarrass the other team … and they would do that even without the 50 point rule.

    The real reason our scoring average is so high is because we have way too many regular season mis-matches … big schools playing small schools, football powers playing basketball powers, etc. League balance is not very good for football … another argument put forth by the district model advocates. Better match-ups would definitely lower our average score closer to the other NE states.

    • Sean Patrick BowleySean Patrick Bowley says

      Absolutely true that it factors, I think.

      Actually, we’ll be posting Matt Glasz’s District proposal shortly.

  3. JB says

    I know Matt love’s the T-day tradition, so can’t wait to see what he proposes as the “work-around” …

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